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Conveniently located at the southwest corner of William Cannon & Mopac

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contact lenses

Contact Lenses

contact lens on finger

We offer a wide selection of contact lens options including disposable soft contact, bifocal/multifocal, toric, and colored lenses. Whether you wear daily, weekly, monthly disposables, or specialty lenses, we will work hard to find contact lenses that fit your needs.

A good contact lens fit starts with a thorough eye exam to ensure the most up-to-date prescription and rule out any pre-existing conditions that could interfere with contact lens wear.

We will determine the best fitting lens based on your lifestyle needs, as well as the shape and health of your eye. In most cases, you’ll have the opportunity to try lenses on the same day as your exam. You may even go home with a few samples before making a final decision.

We follow up the initial fitting to make any necessary changes in fit or materials to get you the best possible fit. We teach all our patients proper contact lens care and also possible consequences if proper care is not taken. Then we continue with long-term follow-up to monitor the condition of the lenses and to ensure that proper hygiene is being maintained.

Contact Lenses for Astigmatism

contacts eye close up woman

Astigmatism occurs when the cornea (the clear front cover of the eye) is irregularly shaped. Instead of the cornea having a symmetrically round shape (like a baseball), it is shaped more like a football, with one meridian being significantly more curved than the meridian perpendicular to it. The irregular shape of the eye makes it hard for traditional contact lenses to fit and provide clear vision and therefore requires specialized contact lenses such as soft toric lenses or rigid gas permeable lenses (RGPs).

What are Toric Contact Lenses?

Toric contact lenses are designed to correct astigmatism and custom made to fit the eye of the patient. Rather than having a perfectly spherical surface like standard contact lenses, toric lenses have a more oblong shape made to accommodate the shape of the astigmatic eye. Toric lenses can be made of either soft or rigid gas permeable (RGP) lens material, however the soft toric lenses are more common.

Soft toric contact lenses are also designed in such a way that the lenses must stay aligned on the eye to maintain proper vision. Sometimes as the eye moves or blinks the lens can rotate considerably on the eye. If this rotation continues with a soft toric lens, a rigid gas permeable lens might be more effective. Rigid gas permeable lenses have a longer initial adjustment time, but once this has passed they are usually just as comfortable as soft contact lenses and they are often easier to care for.

Toric lenses are available in every wearing schedule from daily disposable to long-term wear. Due to the customization required, toric lenses tend to be more expensive and may take more laboratory time to make than traditional lenses.

If you have astigmatism, finding the right fit for your contact lenses is essential. Speak to your eye doctor today for a full assessment to determine which type of toric lenses will work best for you to help you see and feel your best.

 

Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses

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If you are over 40 and have difficulty seeing close up, you probably have a common age-related condition called presbyopia. Presbyopia occurs when the eye’s natural lens loses the ability to focus on close objects. It is a natural process of aging. Individuals with presbyopia are familiar with the need to hold reading materials at arm’s length in order to see clearly, yet can see clearly with reading glasses or bifocal/progressive lenses.

Fortunately for those who don’t like the look, feel or inconvenience of reading glasses, there is another option. Bifocal and multifocal lenses are also available in contact lenses in both soft and Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) varieties.

Multifocal contact lenses are generally designed in one of two ways, as either simultaneous vision lenses or alternating vision lenses.

Soft Contact Lens Multifocals

Soft multifocal lenses are available in a simultaneous vision lens design. These lenses present the distance and near vision zones of the lens at the same time. Typically after a short adjustment period, your eyes learn to utilize the segment of the lens that they need to focus on the desired object and essentially ignore the other.

There are two types of simultaneous lens designs available:

  • Concentric ring design: In the most basic form these are bifocal lenses that are comprised of a central circular area of one power with a ring around of the alternate power, similar to a bulls-eye. The width of each ring is variable depending on the power that is needed most and the edges of the rings can be blended for a smooth transition of focus, similar to progressive eyeglass lenses.
  • Aspheric design: These multifocal lenses attempt to provide a natural vision experience by blending many lens powers across the surface and center of the lens. In this design both distance and near vision power are located in the central visual area and your eyes will adapt to focus on the area needed to view what you are looking at.

Rigid Gas Permeable Multifocals

Translating or alternating vision lenses are similar to bifocal eyeglasses, these contacts are divided into distinct areas or zones and your pupil will move to the desired zone depending on your vision needs. The top of the lens, which is what you look through when looking straight ahead is for distance vision and the bottom area (what you look through when you look down) is for near vision.

Since contact lenses sometimes move within your eye, translating lenses are held in place by a ballast which is an area that is thicker than the rest of the lens or by truncating or flattening the bottom to stay in line by the lower lid. These lenses are only available in rigid gas permeable lens material.

An Alternative Option to Multifocal Contact Lenses: Monovision

Monovision is another contact lens alternative for presbyopia particularly if you have difficulty adapting to multifocal lenses. Monovision splits your distance and near vision between your eyes, using your dominant eye for distance vision and your non-dominant eye for near vision.

Typically you will use single vision lenses in each eye, however, sometimes the dominant eye will use a single vision lens while a multifocal lens will be used in the other eye for intermediate and near vision. This is called modified monovision. Your doctor will perform a test to determine which type of lens is best suited for each eye and optimal vision.